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Druva Documentation

About VMware virtual machine restore

Phoenix Editions: File:/tick.png Business File:/cross.png Enterprise File:/tick.png Elite

Overview

As a Phoenix administrator, you can restore virtual machines anytime back to your virtual infrastructure.

Phoenix provides the following types of restores for virtual machines:

What you should know before restoring a virtual machine

  • Hot snapshots reside on Phoenix CloudCache for a period that you specified at the time of configuring Phoenix CloudCache
  • If you are a group administrator, you can only restore data to a virtual machine that belongs to an administrative group that you manage. Cloud administrators and data protection officers can restore virtual machines across groups. 
  • In the event of a network connection failure at the time of restores, backup proxies attempt to connect to Phoenix Cloud. After the restoration of connectivity, backup proxies restart restores from the state in which they were interrupted. 
  • If you restart or reboot backup proxy during a restore, the restore operation changes to scheduled state and resumes after the virtual machine is up and running.
  • Although Phoenix backs up VMX files along with the VMDK files, you can restore the VMDK files only.
  • The Restore Points follow the backup proxy time zone.
  • If you choose to restore the complete virtual machine, Phoenix creates a new virtual machine with the same configuration as the original virtual machine using the following naming syntax:

    <Name of the original virtual machine>_<counter>

    The <counter> increments by 1 for subsequent restores of the virtual machine.

    Example:
    • For the first restore of a virtual machine named Test Virtual Machine, Phoenix creates a virtual machine called Test Virtual Machine_1.
    • For the second restore, Phoenix creates a virtual machine called Test Virtual Machine_2.
  • If you choose to restore a virtual disk, Phoenix creates a new virtual machine with minimum configuration and associates the VMDK files that you selected to it.
  • Phoenix supports restore of virtual machines to a different ESXi hypervisor, as well as the source hypervisor associated with a vCenter Server on which you installed the backup proxy.
    However, if you deployed backup proxy for a standalone ESXi, you can restore a virtual machine from this ESXi to the source ESXi only.
  • A Thick Provisioned Lazy Zeroed disk is restored as a Thick Provisioned Lazy Zeroed disk.
  • A Thick Provisioned Eager Zeroed disk is restored as a Thick Provisioned Eager Zeroed disk.
  • Thin provisioned VMDK files are restored as Thin disks.
  • CBT status remains unchanged if a virtual machine is restored to the original location. If a virtual machine is restored to an alternate location, CBT is disabled. 
  • Phoenix supports restore of RDM virtual mode disks (vRDM) as VMDK files.
  • If a virtual machine is associated with disks that are configured in different modes, for example, Independent Persistent, Phoenix restores only those disks for which the mode is supported.
  • In case of virtual machine restore to the original location, Phoenix restores the virtual machine to its original network configuration. However, for a virtual disk restore or restore to an alternate location, Phoenix restores the virtual to the default network configuration of the ESXi where it is restored.
  • If a restore fails, the newly created virtual machine is deleted.
  • After a restore, the virtual machine is always powered off. You must manually power on the virtual machine.
  • During an ongoing restore and scheduled backup, if the client machine is restarted then jobs request may not be resent to the client machine.
  • In case of virtual machine restore to the original location, as a backup and restore cannot run in parallel on the same virtual machine, you can cancel the ongoing backup and trigger the restore request. For more information, see Restore virtual machine to original location.
  • In case of virtual machine restore to the original location, two restore requests cannot run in parallel on the same virtual machine.
  • In case of virtual machine restore to the original location, if a backup is triggered while a restore is in progress, the backup will be queued until the restore is complete.
  • In case of virtual machine restore to the alternate location, if a backup is triggered while a restore is in progress, and if backup goes to same backup proxy where restore is running, the backup will be queued until the restore is complete.

As a Phoenix administrator, you can restore virtual machines as per your requirement. 

The following types of restores are supported for virtual machines,

Restore virtual machine to original location workflow

 

 

Step Operations

Step 1

Phoenix administrator initiates virtual machine restore. Phoenix forwards the restore request to the backup proxy pool.

  • Based on the load balancing algorithm, Phoenix automatically identifies the backup proxy that will fulfill the restore request.
  • If the identified backup proxy is busy, the restore request is queued and initiated when the backup proxy becomes free.

Step 2

Phoenix performs a check to ensure that the restore location is not a Network-attached Storage (NAS).

  • In an environment where virtual machines are deployed on ESXi hosts managed by vCenter Server, backup proxy contacts vCenter server to locate the virtual machine.
  • In an environment where virtual machines are deployed on standalone ESXi hosts, backup proxy contacts ESXi host and locate the virtual machine.

Step 3

VDDK connection is established with the virtual machine with SSL transport mode.

Step 4

Backup proxy checks if it is a full virtual machine restore or a VMDK file restore. Backup proxy contacts the virtual machine and establishes a write connection to restore virtual machine data.

  • For a full virtual machine restore:
    • Phoenix restores the virtual disks (VMDKs) of the virtual machine
    • Phoenix detaches the virtual disks attached to the virtual machine after Phoenix backed up the virtual machine
    • Phoenix does not change the name or any other configuration of the virtual machine
  • For a disk restore, Phoenix creates a new virtual machine with minimum configuration (100 MB RAM, 1 CPU, 1 video card, and the disk to be restored) at the location specified, with the following syntax: 
    <Name of the original virtual machine>_<counter>.
Note: For disk restore, create a minimum configuration virtual machine because VMware does not allow to create a disk without creating the virtual machine.

Step 5

Backup proxy obtains the virtual machine data from Phoenix Cloud.

Step 6

Restore operations starts.

Phoenix checks if the restore completes successfully. 

  • If the restore completes successfully, a new virtual machine is available.
  • If the restore fails, Phoenix deletes the newly-created virtual machine.

Restore virtual machine to alternate location workflow

Step Operations

Step 1

Phoenix administrator initiates virtual machine restore. Phoenix forwards the restore request to backup proxy pool.

  • Based on the load balancing algorithm, Phoenix automatically identifies the backup proxy that will fulfill the restore request.
  • If the identified backup proxy is busy, the restore request is queued and initiated when the backup proxy becomes free.

Step 2 

Phoenix performs a check to ensure that the restore location is not a Network-attached Storage (NAS).

  • In an environment where virtual machines are deployed on ESXi hosts managed by vCenter Server, backup proxy contacts vCenter server to locate the virtual machine.
  • In an environment where virtual machines are deployed on standalone ESXi hosts, backup proxy contacts ESXi host and locate the virtual machine.

Step 3

Backup proxy checks if it is a full virtual machine restore or a VMDK file restore.

Backup proxy creates the virtual machine at specified alternate location.

  • For a full virtual machine restore, Phoenix creates a new virtual machine with an identical configuration (that is, the configuration of the virtual machine at the time of backup) at the specified alternate location, with the following syntax: 
    <Name of the original virtual machine>_<counter>
  • For a disk restore, Phoenix creates a new virtual machine with minimum configuration (100 MB RAM, 1 CPU, 1 video card, and the disk to be restored) at the specified alternate location, with the following syntax: 
    <Name of the original virtual machine>_<counter>.
Note: For disk restore , create a minimum configuration virtual machine because VMware does not allow to create a disk without creating the virtual machine.

Step 4

VDDK connection is established with the virtual machine with SSL transport mode.

Step 5

Backup proxy contacts the virtual machine and establishes a write connection to restore virtual machine data.

Step 6

Backup proxy obtains the virtual machine data from Phoenix Cloud.

Step 7

Restore operations starts.

Phoenix checks if the restore completes successfully. 

  • If the restore completes successfully, a new virtual machine is available.
  • If the restore fails, Phoenix deletes the newly-created virtual machine.