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Druva Documentation

NAS proxy logs and configuration details

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This topic contains information about the NAS proxy configuration details, metadata, and log files for NAS devices and NAS shares.

NAS proxy log files

The NAS proxy log files contain details of backups that the NAS proxy performs. Every backup generates a new log file in the following format.

Log file format: Phoenix-<time stamp>-<job ID>.log
Example: Phoenix-20170921-152700-181.log

If the NAS proxy does not function as expected, you can share these log files with the Druva Support team.

Note: Phoenix retains logs for the last 32 NAS proxy activities on each NAS share. 

Log location on NAS shares

You can find the NAS proxy log files at the following locations:

  • Windows 2012 Server
    C:\ProgramData\Phoenix\NAS\logs\backup\<backupset id>\<log file>
  • Windows 2008 Server
    C:\ProgramData\Phoenix\NAS\logs\backup\<backupset id>\<log file>
  • CentOS
    /var/log/Phoenix/NAS/backup/ <backupset id>/<log file>
  • RHEL
    /var/log/Phoenix/NAS/backup/ <backupset id>/<log file>
  • SLES
    /var/log/Phoenix/NAS/backup/ <backupset id>/<log file>
  • Ubuntu
    /var/log/Phoenix/NAS/backup/ <backupset id>/<log file>

NAS proxy configuration details

The Phoenix.cfg file contains the configuration details that the NAS proxy requires to communicate with the Phoenix Cloud. 

Configuration details on NAS share

You can find the NAS proxy configuration details at the following locations:

  • Windows 2012 Server
    C:\ProgramData\Phoenix\NAS\Phoenix.cfg 
  • Windows 2008 Server
    C:\ProgramData\Phoenix\NAS\Phoenix.cfg 
  • CentOS
    /etc/Phoenix/NAS/Phoenix.cfg
  • RHEL
    /etc/Phoenix/NAS/Phoenix.cfg
  • SLES
    /etc/Phoenix/NAS/Phoenix.cfg
  • Ubuntu
    /etc/Phoenix/NAS/Phoenix.cfg

Phoenix agent services

On Windows servers, NAS proxy Client Service manages backups and restores. The PhoenixCPH service on Windows servers ensures that the NAS proxy Client Service is running. On Linux servers, the Phoenix process ensures that NAS proxy is running. 

Note: If NAS proxy  stops working, PhoenixCPH (Windows) or Phoenix (Linux) starts the NAS proxy.